For those who have just started receiving the Journal, welcome!

For those of the Muslim faith, Ramadan Kareem. In the US, we hope you had a great Memorial Day

For those of the Muslim faith, we hope you had a joyous Eid; For us American folk, a happy July 4.

We have started our periodic blog, called the Impatient Strategist. Our latest blog is on why developing a company vision is a bad idea. Please join the discussion!

We are pleased two articles of ours has been published:
In CEO World, about commonly asked questions on teams and teamwork, and in Get Hppy, a human resources publication on do's and don'ts in planning employee surveys.

We'd like to ask a favor of you. To build on the success of the Journal, could you forward this email to two or three colleagues?

We are interested in your comments and feedback. Please click here to do so.

Best regards,

David Chaudron, PhD
managing partner
Organized Change
dgc@organizedchange.com
1 (858) 694 8191 voice and Whatsapp
dchaudron Skype



Strategic Planning

H. Poister, Theodore and Gregory Streib (2005). "Elements of Strategic Planning and Management in Municipal Government: Status after Two Decades."

Public Administration Review. 65 (1), 45-56.

This study analyses the application of strategic planning and management in municipal governments with populations over 25000. The results show that strategic planning is more commonly linked to budgets and performance management. Success factors include the linkage between individual performance and strategic goals and objectives, reporting strategic performance measures to the public, evaluating the feasibility of proposed strategies, tracking performance data over time, targeting new incomes in the budget to achieve strategic goals, and involving external stakeholders in the planning process from the beginning.

To read the longer summary, click here.

Additional articles on strategic planning by Dr. Chaudron are available here.


Balanced Scorecard

Leen Yu, May, Suraya Hamid, Mohamad Taha Ijab, and Hsaio Pei Soo. "The E-Balanced Scorecard (e-BSC)."

Higher Education. 57 (6), 813-828.

This paper focuses on researching the viability of adopting an automated balanced scorecard for managing and measuring the performance of academic staffs in Malaysia's higher education setting. For this, the authors applied the following fact finding methods: Document analysis on the selected university's official strategic planning documents. In depth interviews with the Strategic Planning Unit (SPU) and several faculty deans pertaining to the university's strategic planning process. Observations on the current staff process management system Cross-sectional survey conducted on a sample of lecturers to collect feedbacks from the potential users of the proposed system. It is important to mention that only one faculty was chosen to observe the requirements of and the response to the system. The relevance of this study is given by the inability of local public universities to reach outstanding rankings, fact that was attributed to the lack of proper management and proper monitoring of the university's performance. The authors conclude that the implementation of e-BSC can help setting objectives and understanding expectations as well as improving the communication between the staff and management.

To read the longer summary, click here.

Additional articles by Dr. Chaudron on the Balanced Scorecard are available here.


360 Feedback

A. Beehr, Terry, Lana Ivanitskaya, Curtiss P. Hansen, Dmitry Erofeev, and David M. Gudanowski (2001). "Evaluation of 360 Degree Feedback Ratings: Relationships with Each Other and with Performance and Selection Predictors."

Journal of Organizational Behavior. 22 (7), 775-788.

This paper analyses the relationships of 360 degree feedback rating provided by three sources -managers, peers, and self- with selection and performance measures. In order to examine those relationships, the authors collected data on 2213 employees, most of which were in customer service or information processing, of a Midwestern insurance company. While some of the results thrown by the study encouraged the use of 360 degree feedback, others, such as the negative relationships between self-ratings, selection tests, and performance appraisals, did not. The authors, nevertheless, consider that self-rating is always relevant for developmental feedback setting.

To read the longer summary, click here.

Additional articles on 360 feedback by Dr. Chaudron are available here.


Training

Frazis, Harley and Mark. A Loewenstein. "Reexamining the Returns to Training: Functional Form, Magnitude, and Interpretation."

The Journal of Human Resources. 40 (2), 453-476.

This paper focuses on researching the functional form for formal training in a wage equation and deriving estimates of its return rate. Because there is a positive relationship between a worker's wage and past training investments, the authors suggest that wages should be continuously adjusted. In order to arrive at this conclusion, the authors compared several different simple functional forms to determine which best describes the relationship between formal training and log wages using NLSY and EOPP data.

To read the longer summary, click here.

Additional articles on training by Dr. Chaudron are available here.


Employee Surveys

Myskova, Renata (2011). "A New Measure of Employee Satisfaction."

Global Journal of Business Research. 5 (1).

The aim of this paper is to present a suitable methodology for evaluating employee satisfaction along with an employee satisfaction indicator that could be applied in individual companies considering their particular needs and conditions. Employee satisfaction is found to be determinant of future output rate as well as increasing human potential while dissatisfaction can result in lower working effort and, thus, lower utilization of human resources. The approach includes: a) Analysis and formulation of the process: determination of employee satisfaction influencing factors b) Determination and analysis of all factors which characterize the problem: company employees c) Delimitation of possible solutions: employee satisfaction needs to be observed in regular periods in order to use the gathered data as a feedback for evaluation of already applied changes within the company (related to employee satisfaction). d) Selection and implementation of the selected alternative

To read a longer summary, click here.

For additional articles on employee surveys by Dr. Chaudron, click here.


Teams/Facilitation

Hu, Lingyan and Amy E. Randel (2014). "Knowledge Sharing in Teams: Social Capital, Extrinsic Incentives and Team Innovation."

Group & Organization Management. 39 (2), 213-243.

This study focuses on the relationship between tacit and explicit knowledge sharing, the three dimensions of social capital, and extrinsic incentives with team innovation. In order to better understand the connection between all those elements, the authors asked 219 work teams (1012 team members and 219 team leaders) from China working on industries such as software, manufacturing, telecommunications bio-tech, food processing, and other to assess each one of those components within their team. The results showed that relational and cognitive social capital have the most influence in knowledge sharing which contributes to team innovation.

To read a longer summary, click here.

Additional articles on teams by Dr. Chaudron are here.


Six Sigma

Hu, Lingyan and Amy E. Randel (2014). "Knowledge Sharing in Teams: Social Capital, Extrinsic Incentives and Team Innovation."

Group & Organization Management. 39 (2), 213-243.

This study focuses on the relationship between tacit and explicit knowledge sharing, the three dimensions of social capital, and extrinsic incentives with team innovation. In order to better understand the connection between all those elements, the authors asked 219 work teams (1012 team members and 219 team leaders) from China working on industries such as software, manufacturing, telecommunications bio-tech, food processing, and other to assess each one of those components within their team. The results showed that relational and cognitive social capital have the most influence in knowledge sharing which contributes to team innovation.

To read a longer summary, click here.

Additional articles on TQM/Six Sigma by Dr. Chaudron are available here.